REP PROVISIONS BLOG — ecosystems

5 Basic Principles of Regenerative Agriculture

5 Basic Principles of Regenerative Agriculture

Although regenerative agriculture is far more nuanced than a list of bullet points could ever express, we all need to start somewhere. It can be helpful to think of the 5 principles of regenerative agriculture as building blocks, which can be arranged according to the unique needs, context, and goals of a specific farm or ranch. Why Does Regenerating Soil Health Matter? Soil is where the health of our entire system begins. Regenerative agriculture feeds soil microbes, soil feeds plants, plants feed livestock, and this exchange continues up the food chain all the way to us humans. It’s no coincidence...

Read more →


We're Doing Our Part to Help the Monarchs: Regenerative Agriculture & Migration Habitat Protection Efforts

We're Doing Our Part to Help the Monarchs: Regenerative Agriculture & Migration Habitat Protection Efforts

  Dr. Forrest Pritchard, co-founder of Monarch Watch, notes that monarch butterfly populations are in decline due to habitat loss, climate change, and pesticide use – especially the use of neonicotinoid insecticides. The good news? Regenerative agricultural practices can not only help boost monarch populations, but also improve soil health, sequester carbon, and support other pollinators like bees and wasps in your area. Learn more about our efforts to restore monarch migration habitat through regenerative agriculture! What IS regenerative agriculture? It’s a simple idea, but one that’s often overlooked by conventional farmers. Simply put, it means taking care of your...

Read more →


Regenerative Beef: The Healthier Choice That Goes Beyond Sustainable

Regenerative Beef: The Healthier Choice That Goes Beyond Sustainable

What exactly does regenerative mean? And why should we be concerned about sustainability in our food systems? The answers may surprise you...

Read more →


When Meadowlarks Go Missing

When Meadowlarks Go Missing

Authored by Anthony Hauck A fenceline that a half-century ago had 12 meadowlarks today may only have six. If trends continue, in 25 years, on that same fenceline, there may only be three. Eastern Meadowlarks, in particular, are vulnerable to climate impacts, with a worst-case scenario of eventually losing 37 percent of their current range, mainly across the southern Great Plains and the Southeast.  You won’t find those missing Eastern or Western Meadowlarks on the side of a milk carton. (These close bird relatives are remarkably similar in colors and pattern, with each recognized by its very different song and callnotes.)...

Read more →